Problem with some pictures

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » August 22nd, 2017, 4:32 pm

Thanks. I will use your advice on this.

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » August 29th, 2017, 6:51 pm

I did a few, but your Samuria Showdown is not wanting to get pass that error with the sizes.
UPDATE - I somehow fixed this, but not sure what I did?

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=271&p=2009#p2077

Did I miss anything here?

Code: Select all

 [color=#004080][size=200][b]Samurai Shodown[/b][/size][/color]

[color=#004080][size=150]SNK, 1993, Fighter / Versus[/size][/color]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/01.png[/img]


Although SNK already had the beginnings of some notable fighting series under their belt with games like 'Fatal Fury' and 'Art of Fighting', it was their multi-award winning 1993 smash hit, Samurai Shodown (aka Samurai Spirits in Japan), that really laid the foundations for the company's rise in popularity with arcade enthusiasts. Many outstanding features of what is arguably SNK's most important game distinguished it from the rest of the burgeoning 2D fighter scene at the time. While the craze for 'Street Fighter II' and 'Mortal Kombat' was still going strong in 1993, there was something about Samurai Shodown that began attracting people's interest in the midst of all the competing action.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/02.png[/img]
[i]Bad boy, Earthquake, gets turned on his big fat head by Haohmaru's Senpuuretsuzan.[/i]

Being the first really high quality weapons-based 2D fighter, I can well remember how the exciting sound of clashing steel coming from Samurai Shodown cabinets stole a lot of attention away from the usual fisticuffs of other fighters. Also in the sound department, instead of the catchy tunes that were the norm for most fighting games, Samurai Shodown set itself apart from the crowd with it's inimitable use of feudal Japanese court music. The sounds of traditional instruments created a unique atmospheric accompaniment to the game's pseudo-historical setting.


Arcade History gives a detailed account of some Samurai Shodown characters and their real-life historical counterparts:

[i]"Haohmaru is based on the legendary samurai Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645), whose fighting philosophy heavily influenced that of the Haohmaru character.

Ukyo Tachibana is Based on Sasaki Kojiro Genryu (1572-1612), Musashi's skilled rival.

Jubei Yagyu is based on the historical Yagyu Jubei Mitsuyoshi (1606-1644), who was a sword instructor to the Tokugawa shogunate. The Yagyu clan was a famous clan of samurai.

Hattori Hanzo Masashige (1541-1596) was the most famous of the Iga Ninja clan. He was a genius at leading night raids on forts and fiefs and became a feared assassin. Under his leadership, Iga Ninja became so notorious that Nobunaga felt it necessary to obliterate the Iga Ninja clan.

Wan-Fu seems to be a combination of two famous Chinese warriors. The first is a famous Chinese swordsman who was a rebel during the Ch'ing Dynasty. His name was Wang Ts-bin Wu, but he became known as Da Dao Wang Wu ('Big Scimitar Wang Wu'). The second lead bases Wan Fu upon the ancient, almost legendary, founder of the Chou Dynasty, King Wu Wang.

Amakusa Shiro Tokisada (1622-1638) led a Christian uprising against the Tokugawa shogunate in the Shimabara region of Japan."[/i]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/03.png[/img]
[i]Practice your swordsmanship in this cool bonus stage.[/i]

Another interesting connection, that some readers may have suspected but not been fully aware of, exists between the game and a certain influential anime that was released in the same year. Ever noticed any similarities between Samurai Shodown and the awesome 'Ninja Scroll' movie? If you have then there's a reason why. As well as the aforementioned historical sources of some characters, Arcade History also states that, [i]"In fact, a few designers that worked on Samurai Shodown also worked on the Ninja Scroll anime..."[/i]. In the game this is most noticeable in the character, Gen-an, who shares some attributes with two of the Devils of Kimon, Mushizo and Shijima. Also, the main character in Ninja Scroll, Kibagami Jubei, is a tribute to the historical Yagyu Jubei Mitsuyoshi.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/04.png[/img]
[i]Gen-an feels the pinch as he suffers heavy damage from Haohmaru's Kogetsuzan.[/i]

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/05.jpg[/img]
[i]No self-respecting anime fan would be seen dead without a copy of this in their collection.[/i]

Parallel with censorship controversy surrounding the extreme carnage and other explicit scenes in Ninja Scroll, Samurai Shodown was embroiled in the whole 'violence in video games' uproar generated by Mortal Kombat. The effect on Samurai Shodown was that these concerns caused SNK to censor the game's gore, and even some of it's textual references to death and blood, for it's console releases outside of Japan. This was a contentious issue for overseas fans who bought the cartridges for their Neo Geo AES home consoles under the otherwise normally correct assumption that they would be getting an identical port of the MVS arcade version which, after all, was the original purpose of the AES. This in turn gave rise to a flood AES region modifications as disgruntled gamers set out to restore the home port to it's rightful blood drenched glory. In spite of these difficulties Samurai Shodown is still the most successful cartridge ever produced for the AES.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/06.png[/img]
[i]Arterial spray against the San Francisco sunset.[/i]

The art style of Samurai Shodown, probably in part due to it's association with Ninja Scroll, introduced a new look that was more strongly anime-based than it's rivals. In Street Fighter II, Capcom applied a more shaded, rounded look to it's characters, presumably to make it more appealing to a worldwide audience; an almost self-conscious denial of their own manga culture. The breakthrough international success of anime films like Ninja Scroll and others heralded a change in this perception. Samurai Shodown crystallised a mysterious world of imagination, humour, and dark beauty unlike anything else seen in arcades at the time. This in turn seemed to influence Capcom with their release of games like 'Darkstalkers' the following year, which suddenly sported full anime style characters. All this was a prelude to Capcom adopting these same anime stylings into their main franchise with the release of 'Street Fighter Alpha' in 1995.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/07.png[/img]
[i]Sparks fly in a battle for supremacy.[/i]

With it's array of weaponry Samurai Shodown's gameplay was a departure from the usual fare. Occasionally swords will lock and a furious struggle will ensue that could result in one of the combatants becoming disarmed. Using special moves or even heavy sword strokes can be risky business for a samurai. Precision is called for if you don't want to leave yourself exposed to a swipe of the enemy's blade. That's not to say gameplay is slow however, far from it in fact. You just have to work hard to pick your sweet spots against the game's tough AI. One fun aspect of gameplay is the character's ability to sprint with a double tap of the joystick towards the opponent. The sight of a fearless warrior charging in for the kill can really throw the other guy off their equilibrium sometimes. Double tapping away results in a quick defensive dodge that can also be used to create openings. These abilities add an extra layer of strategy to combat. Then there is the unexpected element of the delivery man who often runs past in the background throwing various items into the fray that can either help or hinder. Although characters do have limited combo possibilities, gameplay leans more towards tactical defense and well-timed counterattack maneuvers, which is eminently suitable to the tension of swordplay. There's nothing quite like the drama of catching an opponent wide open and decimating their life with a rage powered heavy slash!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/08.png[/img]
[i]Awwh yeah... that's what I'm talkin' about![/i]

Another cool addition to Samurai Shodown is the way the game's story elements are implemented in single player mode. Rather than the standard method of defeat all opponents and get an ending as a reward, Samurai Shodown treats the player to several story interludes along the way towards each character's ending. Some of the game's trademark one-liners are just hilarious. Apart from anything else, just going after all the character's individual story quotes can add a huge amount of replay value to the game. You can't help feeling a strong sense of identification with all of Samurai Shodown's different personalities the more you play. While story development in fighting games is a small consideration compared to play mechanics, this is a fine example of the extra care and attention to detail that SNK devotes to their best games.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/09.png[/img]
[i]Who is this crazy funster anyway?[/i]

For me, walking into an arcade back in the day and seeing Samurai Shodown running on one of those giant projector screen setups for the first time was a memorable moment and the beginning of a costly obsession. That passion for the game was not just of the coin munching arcade variety, but also translated into a ridiculously expensive compulsion for the home system and it's high priced cartridges. If you've ever wondered why there are still so many dedicated Neo Geo freaks around the world today, then look to the source; Samurai Shodown, the original cult classic!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/10.png[/img] [img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/11.png[/img]
[i]Hand over your life, Ukyo...[/i]

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/12.png[/img] [img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/14.png[/img]
[i]...and your loot![/i]

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/15.png[/img] [img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0044-samsho/16.png[/img]
[i]Way to go brave samurai.[/i]


My Samurai Shodown gameplay vid.

[youtube]0Xy4xGD2Ons[/youtube]


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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » September 3rd, 2017, 1:32 pm

Another Pete post that don't want to cooaperate. It's on page 7.
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=271&p=3812#p3812

Here is the code. I am 100% certain that it's correct .... but maybe I missed something? I even removed spaced between the img tags!? :confused: :wacko:

There are 29 pictures and I just need to step away from this post as I spent about an hour trying to get it to work.

Code: Select all


[color=#004080][size=200][b]Real Bout Fatal Fury 2 - The Newcomers[/b][/size][/color]

[color=#004080][size=150]SNK, 1998, Fighter / Versus[/size][/color]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/01.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/02.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/03.gif[/img]


[size=150][color=#004080]Part 1 - Best of the Best?[/color][/size]

Who's the best 1v1 fighting game of all? Why, it's you isn't it, Real Bout 2?! Am I going to be completely fair and impartial, or even sane about this? Probably not, I'm a Neo Geo freak and this is Real Bout 2, my fave versus fighter of all! To save me from putting IMOs all the way through this I'll just say straight up that all my personal statements here regarding Real Bout Fatal Fury 2 - The Newcomers (RB2) and related topics are just my opinion; nothing to get all worked up about if you don't agree. Who knows, despite my outrageous bias some readers may even have their horizons broadened a little from reading this recommendation. I'm not sure whether I'm being  brave or foolish but I'm going tell it as I see it about this game and it's place in the versus fighter genre.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/04.png[/img]
[i]The Fatal Fury name is hot enough to cut through plate steel in RB2.[/i]

One thing that's always perplexed me about RB2 and it's older sibling, Real Bout Fatal Fury Special (RBS, 1996), is how generally unheeded they are in the greater scheme of the versus fighting genre. I can understand how the mediocre original Real Bout Fatal Fury (1995) was not that well received, especially considering it's flawed ring out system. It's a travesty though that the two awesome sequels could be passed over so easily in the heat of other more upmarket rivalries, some of which have even spawned their own games (Capcom Vs. SNK anyone?). It's almost enough to put RB2 and RBS in the "hidden gems" category for crying out loud! Then again, a wise man once said there is no accounting for taste as he took a hefty bite out of a raw onion. Yeah, I agree that all of your “Street Fighter”, “King of Fighters”, “Mortal Kombat”, “Tekken” games, etc, etc, etc, are obviously great series in their own right, but I'm not one to just mindlessly follow popular opinion the whole time either. Popular can mean good, but doesn't always necessarily mean better when it comes to individual taste. I'm a bit picky, you know... I don't like many things. For example, I've never watched an episode of “Friends”. I also never found fighting games with motion captured, digitized graphics really all that appealing, so games like Mortal Kombat, etc., usually fail to hold my attention for very long. While it can be fun annihilating enemies in fountains of blood for a while, I find that such over the top theatrics eventually get a little tiresome. 3D polygon fighters don't do much for me either. Don't get me wrong, I've played plenty of Tekken, etc., in my time, but I still find something lacking behind the flashy exterior. Compared to the personality and charm inherent to 2D graphics it all gets a bit stale and robotic after a while, so 3D loses out in the long run as well.

Give me quality hand drawn art and animation any day!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/05.png[/img]
[i]Under the shade of the cherry blossom tree.[/i]


[size=150][color=#004080]Part 2 - Splitting Hairs[/color][/size]

So what is it about RB2 that sets it apart from other 2D arcade fighters? Well, for starters, the Neo Geo is my fave system. Take a look at my [url=http://www.mameaddicts.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=291]collection[/url] to see what I mean. And guess what, the Legendary Hungry Wolf, Terry Bogard, is my fave SNK character. Who would have thought?! So that pretty much rules out most other non-Neo Geo arcade 1v1 fighters.

Sorry Capcom, Midway, Namco, etc, you guys are great and all but it's Neo Geo all the way for this sports fan!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/06.png[/img]
[i]Nap time.[/i]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/07.png[/img]
[i]Ahhh... those were the days...[/i]

The Neo Geo has a singular mystique unlike any other console I own. When I grab one of those massive cartridges and whack it into the trusty old Neo Geo Advanced Entertainment System (AES), just knowing that whatever I'll be playing is virtually identical to the arcade is a feeling special to the Neo Geo. A Neo Geo cartridge is basically the same board as the arcade with the possible inclusion of some extra modes or options for home play. The AES itself is pretty much a portable version of the Neo Geo Multi Video System (MVS) arcade hardware. The MVS works in much the same way as a console and is one reason why it was so popular with arcade operators. Instead of needing to buy a whole cabinet each time a hot new game came out, it was just a simple matter of taking out an old cart to make a slot available and plugging in the new one. Even the memory card is compatible between the arcade and home systems. There's also nothing as authentic as controlling the games with a real SNK 4 button joystick at home.

It's tradition!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/08.jpg[/img]
[i]That's mine![/i]

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/09.jpg[/img]
[i]This is mine![/i]

The AES reigned supreme for many years as the most powerful gaming console in the world. However, the high cost of both the system and it's games kept it in a niche market compared to the more mainstream consoles of the time. It's ability to run perfect ports of quality arcade titles gave it a cult status though, and it remains a much sought after collectors item to this day. Other consoles could only dream of the gaming power of the AES back then, as evidenced by the many second-rate ports of Neo Geo fighting games on the SNES. SNK did eventually try to accommodate the wider gaming public with the introduction of the Neo Geo CD (NGCD), the CD format obviously resulting in a drastic reduction in the game prices, formerly out of reach for most gamers. As it turned out though, the timing was bad since by then other more powerful CD systems such as the Sony PlayStation were also beginning to appear on the market.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/10.jpg[/img]
[i]That's also mine![/i]


I can well remember the first time I really took note of Terry Bogard in "Fatal Fury 2" (FF2) at the arcades in 1992 and how I began to  identify with his character. He just seemed so cool with his regular street clothes and long blonde ponytail, like some sort of street-wise hard rocker who is not to be trifled with! The fact that his moves all have cool names and he yells them out in clear English also makes Terry easy to relate to. "Burn Knuckle!" He is the essence of great fighting character design. I was aware of the original “Fatal Fury” (1991) game but it's kind of similar to what the first “Street Fighter” (1987) was to “Street Fighter II” (1991); fairly primitive. FF2's graphics were impressive for the time, especially the trademark SNK scrolling levels. Duking it out on the train as the endless desert passes by was astounding; I'd never seen anything like it in a versus fighter before. The innovative two plane movement system was unique, adding an extra element of strategy to battles. FF2 is also one of the first 1v1 fighters in history (along with "Art of Fighting", also by SNK, 1992) to introduce the concept of Super Moves to the genre in the form of Hidden Desperation Attacks. Capcom eventually followed suit in 1994 when they finally decided to add Super Moves to “Super Street Fighter II Turbo”. Super Moves are now taken for granted as a staple feature in most versus fighting games thanks to SNK's original inspiration.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/11.png[/img]
[i]Joe goes on a train ride with Terry in FF2.[/i]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/12.jpg[/img]
[i]Classic Terry. Terry is the man![/i]

Terry appears in other games as well, namely as a mainstay character of the KOF series, but I still favour Real Bout's bright, cartoon style over KOF's mature, more rounded look. The final game in the Fatal Fury series and one of the last games made by SNK is the highly acclaimed Garou - Mark of the Wolves, (MOTW, 1999). Conventional wisdom says it's the best versus fighter for the Neo Geo and still one of the greatest 2D fighters of all time. It's little wonder, too, with MOTW pushing the aged hardware past the boundary of what was previously thought possible. Sporting beautiful graphics, animation and sound, MOTW is easily on par with other versus fighters of it's time running on more advanced technology like Street Fighter III 3rd Strike (SFIII3S, 1999). From my perspective, MOTW even outperforms SFIII3S in certain respects, such as the livelier stages. Have a 3 round fight on Terry's train stage in MOTW if you don't believe me. I think any sensible gamer would agree that there's nothing in SFIII3S that compares to that stunning ride. In true SNK fashion MOTW has a mysterious plot that far surpasses the usual fare on offer in most other versus fighters. As for gameplay, I could never really get into the SFIII parry system. I mean, God bless Capcom for trying something different but parrying cheapens the otherwise fantastic Street Fighter gameplay. Classic moves like the Hadouken are rendered almost completely pointless when they can be easily batted away with a simple flick of the wrist. Call me a boring old stick in the mud but I much prefer the traditional approach where special moves are something to be feared, not just brushed off like some annoying mosquito.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/13.png[/img]
[i]Rock and Terry's MOTW train ride begins at sunrise.[/i]

In spite of all that I still like RB2 and RBS better than MOTW. One of my main problems with MOTW is the character roster. Due to plot developments Terry is the only returning character in MOTW and he has abdicated his place as Fatal Fury's central figure to make way for a new young rising star, Geese Howard's son, Rock. Terry is still cool as hell in MOTW but I start to miss my other old favourite characters when I play it. Another big issue for me in MOTW is the gameplay which, as good as it is, feels dumbed down to a Street Fighter level compared to the super high tech thrills of Real Bout's Rush Combo System. A minor complaint is that, using Terry as the only possible reference, the character sprites are smaller in MOTW than they were in Real Bout.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/14.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/15.gif[/img]
[i]Terry giving his younger brother a taste of Burning Knuckles in RB2.[/i]


OK, getting down to the nitty gritty now. For the purposes of this article I needed to make a definitive pick for my fave versus fighter. So how could I choose between RB2 and RBS, two near perfect games? It was an extremely tough decision to make and I changed my mind at least four or five times while writing this. I had to split some pretty fine hairs in the end to call RB2 over RBS. Some of the things that should have tipped the scales in favour of RBS are; four hidden EX characters in RBS (alternate versions of existing characters employing earlier move sets); a hidden Nightmare Match with Nightmare Geese for the best players; the RBS opening focuses on Terry as opposed to the RB2 intro which features the newcomers, Rick Strowd and Li Xiangfei; RBS gives you fighting grades each round which are converted to a ranking at game over, adding replay value; RBS has breakable stage objects that can cause dizzies, plus some classy blood animations,  increasing the violence level somewhat (both removed in RB2); and the NGCD version of RBS has the exclusive [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nA7NkmbvV_E]“Blue Mary's Blues”[/url] bonus music video, one of the best music numbers ever put into a video game. However, there is one major factor that outweighs all other concerns; gameplay. The amazingly smooth, fast and intuitive controls of RBS were noticeably improved in RB2. Better gameplay is where it's at.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/16.jpg[/img]
[i]The guy treading on Terry's cap may have the upper hand for now but watch out, Terry's got the eye of the tiger.[/i]


[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/17.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/18.png[/img]
[i]The RB2 newcomers, Rick and Li.[/i]

So, in 1996 we had the release of RBS. At the time I was taken completely by surprise at the colossal leap forward the series had taken. For whatever reasons, I had been unable to pay much attention to the series since Fatal Fury Special (1993). All of a sudden it was love at first sight and sound! The colours and details of the graphics seemed so much richer than any other comparable 2D arcade versus fighter of the time. The sound effects were beefier than most and the music was instantly appealing. The Rush Combos are still as intense now as they were then. Beyond those readily apparent surface features there's also a certain light-heartedness and sense of humour associated with many SNK games that I value highly. I've never had so many laughs while playing a 1v1 fighter as I have with RBS and RB2. Goofball characters like Hon Fu never fail to crack me up while still being capable of kicking the crap out of their opponents at the same time. What other game has a character who can accidentally saktap himself with his nunchuks after a combo (RBS and RB2) or who invites attack by cheekily sticking out his butt (RB2 only) and then flys into a huge counter-attack rage if his butt gets hit too many times?! RBS also has one of those amusingly over-enthusiastic narrators that I'm fond of. "Hey, how's it goin' dude? And let's begin! Choose your favourite character!" Always nice to hear that friendly welcome at the character select screen. The narrator's role was toned down a fair bit in RB2 though, which was disappointing. I thought, if anything, he should have been even more rabid! Still though, in 1998 the 7th episode of Fatal Fury, RB2, was so exceptional that it's one of the few games to have ever literally invaded my dreams.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/19.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/20.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/21.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/22.png[/img]
[i]Yamazaki taps Hon Fu on the backside one too many times and pays the price.[/i]

I managed to pry my good mate, Nostalgia, away from playing SFIII3S online with me one night for long enough to introduce him to RBS and RB2. I thought his initial impressions of the games were rather interesting. The first thing I recall Nos commenting on was how catchy the music was. Nos has great taste in music so he knows what he's talking about there. After that he said something really remarkable about how much more charismatic the characters seemed compared to other games like Street Fighter. I didn't expect to hear someone say that about Real Bout on their first ever go but Nos is a sharp gamer with a fine appreciation for the artistry that goes into making great video games. I think it reflects that inimitable SNK flair for great character design. Each character's unique personality comes through so effectively in their graphics, animation, voice acting and fighting style. We also talked a bit about the gameplay. Nos was enjoying himself immensely thanks to RBS and RB2 being such great pick up and play games for newcomers. Real Bout's unparalleled Rush Combo System is designed to accommodate all levels of player skill and experience.

It's a guaranteed maelstrom of mayhem for one and all!

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/23.png[/img]
[i]Yamazaki is a badass![/i]


[size=150][color=#004080]Part 3 - Combo Heaven[/color][/size]

All I had to go on when I first got RBS for my NGCD was the Combination Attacks section of the manual's Special Attacks page, which is also the basis of RB2 and reads as follows:

[i]“COMBINATION ATTACKS by pushing A, B, then C buttons in sequence, create combination attacks (“Combos”) with punches followed by kicks and vice versa. Use various button combinations to create unique combinations to thrill your friends and surprise the neighbors.”[/i]

(A button is punch, B button is kick and C button is power attack. With a few exceptions the D button is mainly used for plane movement).

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/24.png[/img]
[i]The game itself doesn't give much hint at what's hidden under the hood either.[/i]

Presumably, anyone with fingers can press A, B, then C quickly enough to perform a basic combo in RB2. The real fun begins when you start experimenting with the advice, “...create unique combinations...”. I always keep a notebook handy whenever I'm practicing RBS or RB2 to keep track of combo variations as I discover them. The trick is knowing when a certain move will complete a combo and whether or not it can be substituted with another move that could either extend the combo further or cause greater total damage. With the basic A, B, C sequence, hitting the C button will end the combo. So, what if you're using Terry in RB2 and you go A, B, then substitute a Special Move for C? Depending on the start up time of the Special Move it may or may not combo after the A, B. If you perform a slower move such as the Power Wave it won't combo whereas a faster move like the Fire Kick will. The Fire Kick is also a nice launcher move which can be followed up with an attack like the Rising Tackle. There are still ways to incorporate slower specials like the Power Wave into a combo though. Terry can also combo off A, C for instance. With C being a power attack the opponent takes longer to recover, allowing the Power Wave to connect into the combo.

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/25.png[/img]
[i]With such a wealth of cool characters in RB2 you'll be creating combos to your heart's content for ages.[/i]

A standard combo extension that all fight fans will be familiar with is to jump in with an air attack. One thing I dig about Terry is that he has the ability to combo twice in the air with a well-timed B, C (doesn't work against short characters though); extending any ground combo by a further two hits. Depending on the complexity of the ground combo, trying to add the two extra air hits can increase the performance difficulty to intermediate or advanced levels. You can start to see how the flexibility of the system allows for the construction of a huge range of combo possibilities by using various interchangeable techniques as building blocks. See my RB2 video below for a selection of different skill level Terry combos and an advanced combo construction example.

[youtube]rKIyX3jmSfE[/youtube]

It's amazing that SNK could create the most responsive, variable and instinctive combo system in the versus fighting arena with just three main attack buttons. Extremely efficient! It makes games with up to twice the amount of attack buttons look redundant in their approach, especially since most of the other combo systems are childlike by comparison. The intricate depths of Real Bout 2's Rush Combos are sure to transport you to a pugilistic paradise in this masterpiece of entertainment!

[b]GET IN THE RING!!![/b]

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/26.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/27.png[/img]
[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/28.gif[/img]

[size=150][color=#004080]1,000th Post Shout Outs![/color][/size]

This is my 1,000th post at MameAddicts so it worked out well that I'd been putting off this particular recommendation for a while.

Cheers to my friends at MA and sincere thanks to all those who have written reviews for Rec Games. If there's a better compilation of in-depth, MAME specific game recommendations on the net then I have yet to see it. I truly appreciate the efforts of everyone who has contributed.

Thank you
Hiero :hello: 

[img]http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%20Games/0065-rbff2/29.gif[/img]
[i]Choice tuna, chicken of the sea.[/i]


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Hierophant
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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Hierophant » September 3rd, 2017, 7:41 pm

Thanks for your help with all those recent edits. Samurai Shodown is spot on now. I'm slowly starting to recover from that cold I caught so I'll have a crack at fixing Real Bout 2 today.

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Hierophant » September 3rd, 2017, 8:39 pm

OK. Fortunately, it didn't take long to spot the problem with Real Bout 2. This was the culprit:

http://www.mameaddicts.com/images/Rec%2 ... ff2/07.png

If you click that you'll see it's in another castle. The image format is the reason. It was a PNG originally but for some reason it's a JPG now. I don't know how that happened. Sorry about the hassle.

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » September 3rd, 2017, 9:20 pm

I finished remapping the images in Rec Games.
3d Rec Games still needs to be done. Maybe I ll get to it tonight. :confused:

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » September 3rd, 2017, 9:22 pm

Hierophant wrote:Thanks for your help with all those recent edits. Samurai Shodown is spot on now. I'm slowly starting to recover from that cold I caught so I'll have a crack at fixing Real Bout 2 today.
Hey no worries I needed to pull my weight on this anyway. I got the rest done on Rec Games.
Feel Better! Sounds like you caught a doozie of a cold. :cold:

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Incito » September 3rd, 2017, 9:35 pm

Rec and 3D Rec Games image re-map is done. :yes:

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Re: Problem with some pictures

Post by Hierophant » September 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

Wow, thanks so much for the help, mate. You are awesome! It's great to see the project restored to its rightful glory.

:woot:

Yeah, that cold really knocked the stuffing outta me. First one I've had in 4 years, so It must've been a bad one to get through the defenses.

Anyway, all that's left for me to do now is give the threads a thorough inspection, then redo all the Rec Games text backups on Google Docs. Not while my brain still feels like jelly, though.

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